How do leading agents define their sphere of influence? (The answers surprised us!)

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How do real estate agents define their sphere of influence

When real estate agents first go into business, they are told to start with the people they know. They start with their friends, their family, their neighbors and even former coworkers. New agents are building a brand while building a business, and it’s easier to start with people with whom they have relationships: their network. This is also known as a real estate agent’s sphere of influence.

For newly licensed agents, your sphere might be all you have. But as you become a more experienced agent, and your sphere expands accordingly, it will continue to play a critical role.

We spoke with leading agents from all over the country about their sphere — how they define it, who they consider part of it, and how they nurture those relationships. 

What’s really fascinating? No two agents’ answer was the same! But they did all agree that their sphere was important.

Watch the video and see how leading real estate agents define their sphere.

(If video doesn’t appear, click here.)

Mark Spain of Mark Spain Real Estate says, “I identify my sphere of influence with people that I come in regular contact with, such as family, friends.” And Nikki Beauchamp of Engels and Volkers says, “There are various layers to my sphere of influence, everything from my immediate social circle, people that I went to school with.”

Agent Alison Domnas of 501 Realty lists her sphere as, “People from college. People from law school. People who have known me since I was a little kid. Even my sixth-grade teacher sent me her son.”

And UNIT Realty’s Joe Schutt says, “I define my sphere of influence in a lot of different ways because there are multiple spheres of influence out there. There’s not just one.” And many more top thinkers share their own definitions.

So how do you define your sphere? How do you nurture it?

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